[rev_slider Dressage]

Latest Blog Posts

See the latest posts from our blog. We continue to post great videos, exercises and news stories so  you are always  in the know. Please join in the conversation we want to answer questions, start conversations and get to know you.

If you have a video or exercise you would like to share please click here to learn more. We will get your story out to over 600,000 viewers, and we give you the credit you deserve!

  • Using the Leg Yield to help with Canter Transition

    Using the Leg Yield to help with Canter Transition

    CanterTransitionrightleadUsing the Leg Yield to help with Canter Transition Use the full arena to get your horse warmed up and moving forward in the working trot. The Aids: The hand aids; as you ride full arena use an indirect rein with a supporting outside rein. Use your inside rein or indirect rein to position his/her poll so you can see your horses inside eye through the corners. At the same time use your outside rein to support the neck so that you do not create too much bend to the inside. The leg aids; position the inside leg at the girth, and the outside leg slightly behind the girth. The seat aids; your weight distributed on both seat bones with a little more weight to the outside. The eyes; your eyes need to be looking across the arena towards your destination. When you are ready, transition down to a walk and turn-down the quarter-line to begin your first leg yield. Ride straight for a few steps and look where you are going. Then prepare your body for the cues for the leg yield. When you are ready, ask for a few good steps over towards your focal point. If you get stuck or, things get weird ride forward. Continue around the full arena and try again. Practice the leg yield several times working up to turning down centerline for a longer leg yield. You can also add the 20-meter circle after each of your leg yields to regain your tempo and balance. Once you have figured out the spatial relationship of where to turn and how to apply your aids, transition to trot. Then turn down the quarter-line and begin your first leg yield at the trot at the end of the leg yield and circle. This first part of the exercise might be enough for the day. If you feel good about your work, then stop. If you want to continue to the canter work, then follow these suggestions. You need to be balanced before you ask for the canter depart when leg yielding you are pushing your horse towards the wall, and creating energy, when you reach the wall ask for the canter depart making sure your horse is balanced, and you have some canter in your trot before the transition. The moment your horse steps up into the canter allow your seat-bone to give forward so your horse's back can come up and carry you. When you are cantering, continue riding forward in a nice large 20m circle to stay balanced. If you don't succeed in the upward transition, don't allow your horse to run away with you at the trot, regain control by setting up and circling get balanced at the trot then start over. Notes for success:
    • Keep your eyes up and look where you are going.
    • Slow everything down if you need to start in the walk then transition for a good walk to a good trot then from a good trot to a good canter.
    • Use your half halts to rebalance your horse
    • If you are struggling with the shoulder-in, then don't try the canter.
    • Leave out any element of this exercise that is too advanced for you and your horse.
    • Quit before you, and your horse gets tired (both physically and mentally!)
  • How do you ride the correct line of a circle?

    How do you ride the correct line of a circle?

    Correct Line of a Circle
      Riding the correct line of a circle The goal of this illustration is to help you understand what it means to  get your horse straight on the circle.  Looking at the illustration or the animation guess which example it correct. The answer is Example C  You want to ride your horse off the inside line  

To ride a circle a circle like this you need to look ahead of your horse and follow the path of the circle with your eyes. Most riders use the path on the inside of the line of the circle shown in (example A) making the horse crooked. This line encourages the horse’s natural tendency to move with the forehand to the outside of the circle. It also encourages the rider to place their hands and weight to the outside resulting in the rider dragging the horses shoulders to the outside of the circle line or creating too much bend in the neck. (Example B) Is closer to the goal illustrating the horse’s spine following the path of the circle. But the most efficient way to follow the line is to keep the circle line on the inside of your horse (example C). To achieve this goal to ride with the circle line to the inside of your horse (example C) you need to use your eyes to look for the inside line at all times. Using your eyes aids in moving your hands slightly to the inside of the circle while your weight stays balanced in the middle of the your horse.
      [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/files/2015/10/CircleLines.swf' width='696' height='231' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false']
     
  • Starting the serpentine with the 20 Meter Circle

    Starting the serpentine with the 20 Meter Circle

    Starting the serpentine with the 20 Meter Circle Starting the Serpentine with the20 Meter Dressage CircleWhy Using the 20 meter circle to start the serpentine is an excellent next step to practice changing your horses bend.  When you start this exercise stay on the 20 meter circle unit you have your horse moving forward with rhythm and impulsion. Once you have your horse flexing on the 20 meter circle at the walk and the trot introduce the change in bend at X.  Once you are riding in the new direction stay on the new circle until you have your horse moving forward with rhythm and impulsion. Use the 20 meter circle to improve lateral flexion on your horse and learn how to change your bend when you change direction. When you ride on a 20 meter circle you teach your horse to soften to the inside aids and you learn how to ride your horse from the inside leg to the outside rein. Think Things to remember when riding a circle is that a circle is circular so you are the same distance from the center at every step on the circle.  Look at the spatial relationship of the circles in the Small and Standard Dressage Arena. While riding the circle your horse should be bent throughout there entire body following the curve of the circle. So the inside of your horse’s body on the track is shorter then outside of your horse’s body on the track of the circle. Notice Circles will reveal stiffness in both the horse and the rider and if you are uneven with your reins the track of the circle is difficult to follow.  When riding the circle your horse’s inside hind foot should track up into your horse’s inside front foot and your horse’s outside hind foot should track up into your horse’s outside front foot. And the riders shoulders and hips should match the horses bend. Plan Start riding the first 20 meter circle at the walk and plan your course. Remember that the bend is constant all the way around the circle.  Think of a circle as having 4 points and ride from point to point on a curved line. Aids Tracking right the right rein or inside rein asks for the bend.  The left rein or outside rein maintains contact and keeps the horse straight on the circle. The riders right leg or inside leg stays on the girth encouraging the horse to move forward and to bend through its body to the inside of the circle. The left leg or outside leg is held slightly behind the girth to control your horses hind end and keep it on the curved track. Tracking Left the left rein or inside rein asks for the bend.  The right rein or outside rein maintains contact and keeps the horse straight on the circle. The riders left leg or inside leg stays on the girth encouraging the horse to move forward and to bend through its body to the inside of the circle. The right leg or outside leg is held slightly behind the girth to control your horses hind end and keep it on the curved track.
  • Moving around the arena with the 20 Meter Circle

    Moving around the arena with the 20 Meter Circle

    Moving around the arena with the 20 Meter Circle 20 Meter Dressage CircleWhy Adding on to the circle exercise  look at the illustration on the spatial relationship of the circle in different areas of the arena.  Try riding the 20 meter circle in all the areas illustrated.  Start at the walk then try the trot and canter if you are comfortable at each of these gaits. To improve your circles you can add cones or blocks in the corners to help direct you along the path to the circle.  From the corner or side of the arena take three average sized steps and drop your cone (illustrated here in blue)  You do not need to place all the cones at the same time.  The illustration is just a visual guide to where the cones are places.  Once you have the cones places remember you ride on the inside of the cones to ride a circle and the outside of the cones to ride the corner. Use the 20 meter circle to improve lateral flexion on your horse and learn how to change your bend when you change direction. When you ride on a 20 meter circle you teach your horse to soften to the inside aids and you learn how to ride your horse from the inside leg to the outside rein. Think Things to remember when riding a circle is that a circle is circular so you are the same distance from the center at every step on the circle.  Look at the spatial relationship of the circles in the Small and Standard Dressage Arena. While riding the circle your horse should be bent throughout there entire body following the curve of the circle. So the inside of your horse’s body on the track is shorter then outside of your horse’s body on the track of the circle. Notice Circles will reveal stiffness in both the horse and the rider and if you are uneven with your reins the track of the circle is difficult to follow.  When riding the circle your horse’s inside hind foot should track up into your horse’s inside front foot and your horse’s outside hind foot should track up into your horse’s outside front foot. And the riders shoulders and hips should match the horses bend. Plan Start riding the first 20 meter circle at the walk and plan your course. Remember that the bend is constant all the way around the circle.  Think of a circle as having 4 points and ride from point to point on a curved line. Aids Tracking right the right rein or inside rein asks for the bend.  The left rein or outside rein maintains contact and keeps the horse straight on the circle. The riders right leg or inside leg stays on the girth encouraging the horse to move forward and to bend through its body to the inside of the circle. The left leg or outside leg is held slightly behind the girth to control your horses hind end and keep it on the curved track. Tracking Left the left rein or inside rein asks for the bend.  The right rein or outside rein maintains contact and keeps the horse straight on the circle. The riders left leg or inside leg stays on the girth encouraging the horse to move forward and to bend through its body to the inside of the circle. The right leg or outside leg is held slightly behind the girth to control your horses hind end and keep it on the curved track.
  • Riding the 20 Meter Circle

    Riding the 20 Meter Circle

    20 Meter Dressage Circle Riding the 20 Meter Circle Why Use the 20 meter circle to improve lateral flexion on your horse and learn how to change your bend when you change direction. When you ride on a 20 meter circle you teach your horse to soften to the inside aids and you learn how to ride your horse from the inside leg to the outside rein. Think Things to remember when riding a circle is that a circle is circular so you are the same distance from the center at every step on the circle.  Look at the spatial relationship of the circles in the Small and Standard Dressage Arena. While riding the circle your horse should be bent throughout there entire body following the curve of the circle. So the inside of your horse’s body on the track is shorter then outside of your horse’s body on the track of the circle. Notice Circles will reveal stiffness in both the horse and the rider and if you are uneven with your reins the track of the circle is difficult to follow.  When riding the circle your horse’s inside hind foot should track up into your horse’s inside front foot and your horse’s outside hind foot should track up into your horse’s outside front foot. And the riders shoulders and hips should match the horses bend. Plan Start riding the first 20 meter circle at the walk and plan your course. Remember that the bend is constant all the way around the circle.  Think of a circle as having 4 points and ride from point to point on a curved line. Aids When you begin in this example to the right the right rein or inside rein asks for the bend.  The left rein or outside rein maintains contact and keeps the horse straight on the circle. The riders right leg or inside leg stays on the girth encouraging the horse to move forward and to bend through its body to the inside of the circle. The left leg or outside leg is held slightly behind the girth to control your horses hind end and keep it on the curved track.
  • Dressage Exercise ~The Shallow Loop

    Dressage Exercise ~The Shallow Loop

    ShallowloopTwoShallowloopOneThe Shallow loop is an exercise that teaches your horse to bend in both directions while laying the groundwork for lateral exercises. Begin at the walk and start with a 10-meter shallow loop. When you start with the deeper shallow loop, you make the exercise easier.  Easier to teach your horse, and easier for you to learn.  Slowing down and taking a longer path gives you the rider more time to organize your thoughts and your aids.  It also helps you stay in the moment, allowing you to plan and, think.  Be thoughtful about where to look, how to apply your leg and hand aids, and where your shoulders and seat are over the back of your horse. This exercise includes two changes of bend. The changes in bend should happen at the quarter-lines as you are moving towards then away from the center-line before you ask your horse for a change in bend give your horse notice with a half-halt.  As you are riding, take note how your horse responds when you break the question down into manageable parts. If you or your horse are struggling practice the same loop in both directions at the walk, stay at the walk until you are confident and comfortable and master this task. Only when you have mastered the exercise at a walk,  should you try it at the trot.  When you change what you are doing you escalate the difficulty of the exercise, so don't try at speed or change the loop unless you are ready.  When you change your gait or make the loop shallower,  the changes in bend come up quickly.  So take your time and make sure you are ready. When you ride your horse through this exercise, do not push yourself, or your horse past your fitness levels do not ask for more than you can reasonably accomplish. When you slow the exercise, down and you stop before you are exhausted you are making it doable, and exercises when done properly are building a foundation for future success and solid training. When you feel like you have mastered the exercise at a walk, and you try the trot and if everything falls apart step back. Simply go back to the walk re-establish the successful connection with your horse then try the trot work again or stop for the day at the walk. Then introduce the trot work the next time you ride. It is always a good idea when you reach the point when you are getting tired start looking for a good place to end, go back to the barn and groom and hug your horse.
    [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/files/2015/10/shallowloop.swf' width='492' height='568' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false']  
  • Dressage Exercise Leg Yield with Half Circles.

    Dressage Exercise Leg Yield with Half Circles.

    [caption id="attachment_8658" align="alignright" width="303"] Example Two[/caption] Leg Yield to Center-line then Half Circle to the wall. This exercises if building on yesterdays The Leg Yield to Quarter-line with a Half Circle.  You can try this exercise  at the walk, and trot.  Start at the walk  so you can learn the exercise and teach it to your horse.  In this exercise you are asking for more lateral (sideways) movement. If you get stuck ride forward and circle and try again.  Your primary goal is to increase your lateral movement in increments. This is the first example in a series of four. Step One:  Get your horse stepping out and in front of your leg.  He should be traveling forward with a nice even pace not slowing down or speeding up, without  you nagging him along with your leg or pulling with your hands.  If he won't go forward willingly make a correction.  If he tries to slow down again ask with a soft aid to send him forward. If the soft aid does not work then make another correction repeat this until you get a nice forward horse that listens to  soft aids and does not need to be nagged to keep moving forward. When you approach the corner to start your first Leg Yield come across the short side of the arena, half halt before the turn, then ride forward straight to H. Then start pushing your horse over one step at a time into the Leg Yield.  The Leg Yield is a movement where you ask your horse to move forward and sideways at the same time. In example two you are asking for more lateral movement, the goal is to leg yield to the center-line giving yourself enough distance to get to X where you can ride forward into a half circle back to the arena wall. What happens at H is, you change your bend and start to leg yield.  Two things have happened; One your aids are opposite your new outside rein is your right hand and your new inside rein is your left hand,  the same follows with your legs. Now your horse is bent in the new direction. Next you leg yield your horse laterally.  As you begin the  leg yielding across the arena to the center-line you are bending in the new direction and moving away from your new inside leg laterally (or sideways AND forward).  When you have completed your leg yield you need to ride forward into the half circle. This circle should be easy as your horse is already bent in the new direction, when you start the circle you stop moving laterally and ride forward back to the arena track. Hands: When you are tracking to the left as you see in example two before the leg yield.  Have contact on your right hand, the outside rein, this rein is used to keep your horse straight and control your horses speed or pace. You also have contact on your left hand, the inside rein, this rein should be softer and more active to encourage your horse to flex to the inside of the arena through the corners and circles in this direction. Legs: When you are tracking  to the left as you see in example two before the leg yield.  Hold your right leg lightly on your horses side. You use this leg to create impulsion and to keep your horse straight.  If your horse is forward and straight then this leg remains neutral. Your left leg or inside leg is more active and used to encourage your horse to bend to the inside of the arena through the corners and circles in this direction. Step Two:  Once you are back on the wall revisit  in both directions and ride it as often as you need to to gain confidence. Follow all the directions above with your aids changed for the new direction. [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/files/2015/09/legyieldtohaflcircleexampletwo.swf' width='487' height='550' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false'] For access to all our animated exercises and the USEF dressage tests for (USDF) Dressage and (USEA) Eventing become a member click here.
  • Dressage Exercise Leg Yield with Half Circles.

    Dressage Exercise Leg Yield with Half Circles.

    [caption id="attachment_8656" align="alignright" width="302"]one Example One[/caption] Leg Yield to Quarter-line then Half Circle to the wall. The Leg Yield with a Half Circle.  You can try this exercise  at the walk, and trot.  Start at the walk  so you can learn the exercise and teach it to your horse. This is the first example in a series of four. Step One:  Get your horse stepping out and in front of your leg.  He should be traveling forward with a nice even pace not slowing down or speeding up, without  you nagging him along with your leg or pulling with your hands.  If he won't go forward willingly make a correction.  If he tries to slow down again ask with a soft aid to send him forward. If the soft aid does not work then make another correction repeat this until you get a nice forward horse that listens to  soft aids and does not need to be nagged to keep moving forward. When you approach the corner to start your first Leg Yield come across the short side of the arena, half halt before the turn, then ride forward straight to M. Then start pushing your horse over one step at a time into the Leg Yield.  The Leg Yield is a movement where you ask your horse to move forward and sideways at the same time. In example one you start small, the goal is to leg yield to the first quarter line giving yourself enough distance to get to B where you can ride forward into a half circle back to the arena wall. What happens at M is, you change your bend and start to leg yield.  Two things have happened; One your aids are opposite your new outside rein is your left hand and your new inside rein is your right hand,  the same follows with your legs. Now your horse is bent in the new direction. Next you leg yield your horse laterally.  As you begin the  leg yielding across the arena to the first quarter-line you are bending in the new direction and moving away from your new inside leg laterally (or sideways AND forward).  When you have completed your leg yield you need to ride forward into the half circle. This circle should be easy as your horse is already bent in the new direction, when you start the circle you stop moving laterally and ride forward back to the arena track. Hands: When you are tracking to the right as you see in example one before the leg yield.  Have contact on your left hand, the outside rein, this rein is used to keep your horse straight and control your horses speed or pace. You also have contact on your right hand, the inside rein, this rein should be softer and more active to encourage your horse to flex to the inside of the arena through the corners and circles in this direction. Legs: When you are tracking  to the right as you see in example one before the leg yield.  Hold your left leg lightly on your horses side. You use this leg to create impulsion and to keep your horse straight.  If your horse is forward and straight then this leg remains neutral. Your right leg or inside leg is more active and used to encourage your horse to bend to the inside of the arena through the corners and circles in this direction. Step Two:  Once you are back on the wall revisit  in both directions and ride it as often as you need to to gain confidence. Follow all the directions above with your aids changed for the new direction. [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/files/2015/09/legyieldtohaflcircleexampleonefla.swf' width='478' height='550' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false'] For access to all our animated exercises and the USEF dressage tests for (USDF) Dressage and (USEA) Eventing become a member click here.  
  • Compare Training Pyramids and Charts

    Compare Training Pyramids and Charts

    Dressage Scale or Pyramid of TrainingTraining Pyramids and Charts and USDF, Western Dressage, , German Training Scale, Cowboy Dressage The United States Dressage Association Dedicated to education, the recognition of achievement and promotion of dressage, USDF is a tax-exempt 501(c)3 organization with more than 30 different educational programs, 125 affiliate local or regional clubs and more than 2000 annual awards for excellence in competition.

    German National Equestrian Federation I am not quite sure where I first saw the German Training Scale.  I am guessing on from the German National Equestrian Federation's Published material.  The link above is all in German and I do not speak German and had to rely on Google Translate, so I hope this is correct. ( Wer Deutsch spricht Bitte korrigieren Sie mich , wenn ich das falsch .)

    Cowboy Dressage By blending both disciplines and taking the best from both, the rider becomes more educated, patient, and understanding, allowing for the partnership between horse and rider to bloom... that partnership being the goal of all good horsemen and horsewomen. Western Dressage Association of America Our mission is to build an equine community that combines the Western traditions of horse and rider with Classical Dressage. We honor the horse, We valuse the partnership between horse and rider. We celebrate the legacy of the American West.
  • The Shallow Loop

    The Shallow Loop

    The Shallow Loop:
    10 Meter shallow loop dressage exercise5 Meter shallow loop dressage exercise The Shallow loop is an exercise that teaches your horse to bend in both directions while laying the groundwork for lateral exercises. Begin at the walk and start with a 10-meter shallow loop. When you start with the deeper shallow loop, you make the exercise easier. Easier to teach your horse, and easier for you to learn. Slowing down and taking a longer path gives you the rider more time to organize your thoughts and your aids. It also helps you stay in the moment, allowing you to plan and, think. Be thoughtful about where to look, how to apply your leg and hand aids, and where your shoulders and seat are over the back of your horse.
    This exercise includes two changes of bend. The changes in bend should happen at the quarter lines as you are moving towards then away from the center-line before you ask your horse for a change in bend give your horse notice with a half-halt. As you are riding take note how your horse responds when you break the question down into manageable parts. If you or your horse are struggling practice the same loop in both directions at the walk, stay at the walk until you are confident and comfortable and master this task.
    "Remember practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect," ~James C. Wofford.
    Only when you have mastered the exercise at a walk, should you try it at the trot. When you change what you are doing you escalate the difficulty of the exercise, so don't at speed or change unless you are ready. When you change your gait or make the loop shallower, the changes in bend come up quickly. So take your time and make sure you are ready.
    When you ride your horse through this exercise do not push yourself, or your horse past your fitness levels do not ask for more than you can reasonably accomplish. When you slow the exercise, down and you stop before you are exhausted you are making it doable, and exercises when done properly are building a foundation for future success and solid training.  When you feel like you have mastered the exercise at a walk, and you try the trot and if everything falls apart step back. Simply go back to the walk re-establish the successful connection with your horse then try the trot work again or stop for the day at the walk. Then introduce the trot work the next time you ride. It is always a good idea when you reach the point when you are getting tired start looking for a good place to end, go back to the barn and groom and hug your horse.

    [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/shallowloop.swf' width='490' height='612' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false']
  • Dressage Exercises: Beginning trot poles on a 20m circle.

    Dressage Exercises: Beginning trot poles on a 20m circle.

    Beginning trot poles on a 20m circle.

    20MtrotpoleIf you have never worked through trot poles, then walk through 20-meter circle over the pole until you are confident. Set your goal to keep your horse going forward over the pole. Once you are comfortable with the single pole you have two options.
    1. Continue at the walk and add another pole (step 2)
    2. Try trotting with the single pole
    The addition of poles does not have to happen all in one day. Depending on your and your horse's experience, add poles accordingly. Take as much time as you need to get four poles in place. This exercise can be done at the working trot and the canter.  At pony club camp we call it the circle of death. 🙂 HA!  it is a wonderful exercise to keep your horse focused and balanced. As you are riding try to keep your upper body tall and centered over your hips and keep your hands, and arms supple following your horse's mouth. Avoid pulling or gripping with your hands or legs. If your horse speeds up through the ground poles then make your adjustment on the circle where there are no poles, and enforce the half-halt and as you approach the poles. If your horse is running away with you and speeding through the circles back everything off and go back to the walk. When you are balanced in and in control, ride the circles in both directions changing rein through the center of the circle or turn out in a big rollback. When you are working on this exercise focus on rhythm and balance eventually your horse should step directly over the pole like it is not there. Don't allow your horse to speed up when he sees the pole if you need to make a small circle in the opposite direction and stay on that circle until you have regained your rhythm and pace then circle back to the pole. Give yourself and your horse frequent breathers and quit while you are ahead. You are much better off working through any exercise accurately then excessively.  
    [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/files/2015/09/20Mtrotpoleanimated.swf' width='794' height='1189' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false']
  • Leg Yield and Turn On The Forehand

    Leg Yield and Turn On The Forehand

    LegYieldTurnontheForehand2This exercise combines the leg yield and the turn on the forehand. When you work on exercises at the walk, everything is slowed down so you can focus on your body and how effective your aids are. You also give your horse time to learn the exercise. The most common problem in riders is when they give up or change their aids when they don’t get the expected result immediately. Remember it takes time to figure out your body and, for your horse to figure out his. You need to stick with the correct aids and trust that, with some patience and practice, you will get the result you are expecting. To begin this exercise ride an active walk. Use your corners practice your half-halts to re-balance your horse and to regain his attention. Once your horse is moving forward and listening try your first leg yield. Encourage your horse to move forward and sideways away from your leg. If you get stuck, ride your horse forward in a straight line. Then work on your corner and try the exercise again. Stay with the leg yield until you are successful then add the turn on the forehand. If you decide to try the turn on the forehand, make a plan. Start with your leg yield then walk a few steps forward into an active straight halt. Once your horse halts, move your inside leg slightly behind the girth and apply pressure gently asking for a step by step movement away from your leg. Remember if your horse ignores your leg you can give him a sharper aid but you must always return to the soft aid. Keep your inside rein active (gently squeezing your fingers) to help your horse stay slightly flexed to the inside. Hold your outside rein steady to control the degree of bend in his neck and to prevent stepping forward. Your goal is to have your horse’s hind legs move in a circle around his fore-legs. Remember If you get stuck, ride forward and try again.    
    [topswf swf='http://www.thedigitalhorse.com/membersonly/wp-content/blogs.dir/6/files/2015/09/Turnontheforehand.swf' width='301' height='550' quality='best' wmode='transparent' scale='default' flashvars='' allowfullscreen='false']